TrustAct

Illinois Trust Act Becomes Law

by

On Monday, the Illinois Trust Act, a bill to create better relations between the immigrant and law enforcement became law. It is refreshing to see a bill that benefits Illinois being passed without the need for a veto override. Congratulations to the campaign for a #WelcomingIL and everybody who went down to fight for this bill with us as part of the Illinois People’s Agenda.

From NBC Chicago:

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner signed into law Monday a measure to prevent law enforcement officials across the state from detaining individuals based solely on their immigration status, and limit local agencies’ cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

The governor signed Senate Bill 31, known as the Illinois TRUST Act, in front of a crowd at the Mi Tierra restaurant in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood.

“Illinois has been welcoming of immigrants for a long time, and this bill will continue that tradition,” Rauner said in a statement. “It also makes clear that stopping violent crime will be law enforcement’s mission rather than working on federal prerogatives that a federal court has found illegal.”

 The General Assembly passed the bill in May, sending it to the Republican governor’s desk the following month. After spending nearly two months deciding what to do with it, Rauner first indicated during a radio interview earlier this month that he would support the bill, saying he thought “it seems very reasonable.”

The measure will prohibit police officers and other law enforcement officials from stopping, detaining, or arresting anyone based solely on their immigration status or an immigration detainer – effectively limiting the role of local authorities in the enforcement of federal immigration laws.

Nothing in the bill – which was scaled back from its original form through negotiations involving advocacy groups, law enforcement, businesses and other stakeholders – prohibits agencies from communicating with immigration authorities, and local authorities can hold individuals if presented with a criminal warrant. The bill also includes a provision to require law enforcement agencies to provide officers with guidance on complying with the law.

“Immigrants in our community should not have to feel unsafe when they go to work or take their children to school,” the bill’s primary House sponsor, state Rep. Chris Welch (D-Hillside), said in a statement. “This legislation will ensure that proper legal procedures are being followed and provide peace of mind to members of our community.”

Read more here